[vimeo 167793828 w=1920 h=1080]

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FOLI is a word that throughout Africa is interpreted as RHYTHM. This all-new immersive event will illustrate how cultures in Africa use drum and dance to tell the story of the human life cycle. CinemaSalem and Creative Salem are proud to present an extraordinary event led by dance instructor/professor Greg Coles and his students highlighting and educating audience members through a blend of dance, photography, drum, text and video. This will be an educational, invigorating and transformative evening you do not want to miss.

https://bit.ly/FOLI-TICKETS-CINEMASALEM

This spectacular celebration of African drum and dance is called “FOLI:  Rhythm of African Life”. Part light show, part dance celebration, and part music extravaganza, this one-night-only, immersive experience creates a visceral depiction of African life through drum, dance and photography by Allison Williams from her journey to Africa. 

During ceremonies and cultural rituals, Africans use rhythm and dance to celebrate individual and community arrival at or passage through a life stage.  

These stages (birth, growth, maturity, transition and transcendence) mark the progression of an African’s life from the birth of a person to the growth of an individual to the maturation of an adult to the selection of a family to a role in the community to a life remembered.  

The goal of African life is to live a life worthy of being remembered so that one’s name would be given to a newborn in the hopes of that child will take on your strengths and serve the community as well as you served.  

Revisiting this life cycle through ritual and ceremony focuses attention on the best in African life to serve the greater good.  The community becomes stronger as the individual becomes stronger through the giving of a name. 

The goal of African life is to live a life worthy of being remembered so that one’s name would be given to a newborn in the hopes of that child will take on your strengths and serve the community as well as you served.  

Revisiting this life cycle through ritual and ceremony focuses attention on the best in African life to serve the greater good.  The community becomes stronger as the individual becomes stronger through the giving of a name. 

Greg Coles is a native New Yorker who was raised in Connecticut where he attended Walsh School (Valedictorian), The Taft School (Track Team Captain, England High Hurdle Champion), Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater School (Scholarship Student) and finished his undergraduate degree at Wesleyan (Soloist in Ebony Singers Choir, Drummer in a Jazz Band, VP of Student Events Committee, Guest House Manager).  

Greg combines his love of art with his knowledge of business.

A singer (voiced at high baritone, middle and high tenor with contralto up to soprano falsetto) and musician (piano and drums), as a teenager Greg used his voice to perform for thousands as a soloist in various church choirs; used the piano to put his music composition and choral leadership skills to use during his nearly 20 year career as a worship team Member and Choir Director for worship teams; lead many in praise and worship as a Worship Team Leader and Elder of Music Ministry for churches; and, played drums (Latin percussion, African drums and the traditional drum kit) for a college jazz band, numerous worship teams and hundreds of dance classes, all from his teen years to the present.

In Boston, Greg completed his MBA at Harvard.  While at Harvard he revived his drum and dance career.  Thus, although a technology professional (System Engineer and Sales), Sigma Black Belt and Business Strategist (Consultant) with work at IBM, Xerox, Forrester Research, IKON Office Solutions, Rennaisance Worldwide and The Burton Group; Greg pursued his passion for the arts by forming and running his own company, Greg Coles Dance and Drum; and a band, Picante Soul.  

These endeavors helped him understand how to make art his fulltime passion.

He uses his consulting and business skills to keep the business in his art and; of course, he makes art his business, building community through the arts, learning as he goes.  

He commits to being a lifelong learner as a student of languages and an avid reader and student of the human situation.  He reads old English writers, American classics, women writers, African American classics, sociology writers, religious writers, self help models, art critics, historians, playwrites, fiction, non-fiction and books of antiquity.  He seeks to understand (people and their behavior), to help (when his skills may be properly applied) and to grow (through cultural immersion).  He receives current tutoring in Spanish, Italian and French; and, learns songs in the above plus in African dialects and in Portuguese.

Greg’s lifelong study is know how African dance affects identity development, enhances community making and parents almost every other form of dance.  At age 12 he was in his first African dance company, The Takata Dancers, and continues to study and teach the (story telling) dances of Mali, Senegal and Guinea, West Africa.  In 2000, he visited and danced in Mali.

He is Guest Lecturer of Dance at Tufts Univeristy, Visiting Professor of Dance at Salem State University, African Dance Teacher at The Dance Place, Latin Dance Instructor at North Shore Performing Arts Center; and, runs numerous classes, public and private entainment events and school enrichment programs.

This is an original production presented by CinemaSalem and Creative Salem for the first time in the world. Don’t miss it!

TICKETS

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